FIXEUR – Ethics in Journalism. Fake News. Fake Stories, April 22nd, 1pm, AMC River East 21, Chicago

 

The landscape in which journalists now work is substantially different to that of the twentieth century. The rise of digital and social media necessitates a new way of considering the ethical questions facing practicing journalists.
This debate considers the various individual, cultural and institutional influences that have an impact on journalistic ethics today. It also examines the links between ethics and professionalism, the organisational promotion of ethical values and the tensions between ethics, freedom of information and speech, and the need to disseminate information.
The debate will link the discussions on ethics in journalism to the emergence of fake news and stories. In an era of unprecedented informational speed, flawed deontology automatically translates into a certain degree of news or stories fakeness. The quest for „hot” topics is often done at the expense of authenticity, fairness, or even emotional balance of the involved persons.
By building on the theoretical underpinnings of journalistic ethics with inputs from academic with international background, this debate provides an insightful analysis of the ethical challenges faced by the media in the twenty-first century. It will produce essential ideas for students of journalism and practising journalists, as well as for the general public, by focusing on the following dilemas:

  • Is freedom of speech of the investigation journalists more important than the freedom of speech of the persons involved in the investigated topics, such as witnesses or victims?
  • How to identify and mitigate the emotional abuse done by journalists? Or is this the right price to be paid for a good story?
  • Is the emotional abuse or pressure less important than the physical one?
  • How to respect the free will of persons involved in the investigated topics?
  • How does the „fake it until you make it” bias work in investigative journalism? Do journalists become the prisonniers of their own investigative biases?

Special Guests:

– Tudor Vlad Ph.D., Professor at College of Communication and Public Relations – National University for Political Studies and Public Administration (SNSPA) & director of the James M. Cox Jr. Center for International Mass Communication Training and Research and professor in the Department of Journalism, Henry W. Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Georgia

– Lee Hood, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Broadcast News, Loyola University Chicago

– Ciprian Tudor Ph.D., College of Political Science – SNSPA, expert in anthropology, image philosophy, the history of ideas and the sociology of representations

– Loredana Radu Ph.D., Head of the Communication Department at College of Communication and Public Relations – National University for Political Studies and Public Administration (SNSPA)

Lee Hood, PhD, Associate Professor, Broadcast News, Loyola University Chicago

Lee Hood joined the School of Communication faculty as an Associate Professor in Broadcast Journalism in Fall 2009. Hood has won two Emmys for her work as a television news producer and a faculty teaching award at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

She has contributed to and edited a book, written a number of book chapters and published a number of articles. During her news career, she has worked at half a dozen television stations, including three of four of Denver’s network affiliates. She also has reported for a newspaper and for radio.

In Fall 2010 Dr. Hood presented her research in media studies and cultural geography focusing on how changes in regulation have changed the oversight and production of local news as part of the SOC Faculty Speaker Series: Notes from the Field.

Loredana Radu Ph.D., Head of the Communication Department at College of Communication and Public Relations – National University for Political Studies and Public Administration (SNSPA)

Loredana Radu is Associate Professor, Head of the Communication Department and the Director of the Center for EU Communication Studies at the College of Communication and Public Relations in NUPSPA. Since 2016, she is the Academic Coordinator of the Jean Monnet Module “Patterns of Europeanization in Central and Eastern Europe” (2016-2019). She holds a PhD in Sociology from the National University for Political Studies and Public Administration NUPSPA (Bucharest) and a MBA degree from the CEU Business School (Budapest).

Loredana has an wide experience in managing EU-funded projects, as well as other types of organizational development programs. Her research and professional interests focus on Europeanization (i.e. discursive/narrative construction of Europe), attitudes towards the EU (i.e. euroscepticism, anti- europeanism, extremism, europopulism), project management, evidence-based policy making, and development models.

Dr. Tudor Vlad, Director James M. Cox Jr. Center for International Mass Communication
Training and Research, University of Georgia

Dr. Tudor Vlad is the Director of the James M. Cox Jr. Center for International Mass Communication Training and Research at the University of Georgia. He also is a Ph.D.coordinator in the Doctoral Program of the College of Communication and Public Relations of the National University of Political Studies and Public Administration, Bucharest, Romania.
While being in the Cox Center, Dr. Vlad has conducted workshops in Romania, Belarus, Kenya, Republic of Moldova, the Philippines, Russia, Ukraine, Hungary, and the United States and has hosted over 70 groups of media experts and educators.

Since June 1998, Dr. Vlad has been a Director for Central Europe of the World Free Press Institute, San Francisco, California. In 2008-2010, Dr. Vlad was a consultant to The New York Times. In 2009, Dr. Vlad was a consultant to the Russian Journalists’ Union (RUJ).

Dr. Vlad has written on assessment of press freedom indicators, evaluation of international media assistance programs, movie history and role in the society, media systems in emerging democracies, media management in post-totalitarian regimes, and journalism and mass communication curricula.

Ciprian Tudor, PhD.

Researcher at ICCV, Romanian Academy.

Associate Professor at the National University of Political Studies and Public Administration, Bucharest.

He has an academic background in philosophy, anthropology and visual studies.